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Real Estate : Equity Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) | Small Cap Blend
Company profile

American Campus Communities, Inc. is a self-managed and self-administered equity real estate investment trust (REIT). The Company's segments include Wholly-Owned Properties, On-Campus Participating Properties, Development Services, and Property Management Services. It is engaged in the acquisition, design, financing, development, construction management, leasing and management of student housing properties. The Wholly-Owned Properties segment consists of off-campus properties, which are located in close proximity to the school campus. The On-Campus Participating Properties segment includes on-campus properties that are operated under long-term ground/facility leases with three university systems. The Development Services segment consists of development and construction management services that it provides through one of its taxable REIT subsidiaries for third-party owners. The Property Management Services segment includes revenues generated from third-party management contracts.

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10-day average volume:
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Netflix says it can hit net zero emissions by 2022, promotes calculator to measure streaming footprints

12:50 pm ET March 30, 2021 (MarketWatch)
Print

Rachel Koning Beals

The latest pledge does not include emissions from internet transmission or electronic devices members use to watch Netflix

Streaming giant Netflix Inc. believes it can reach net zero emissions as soon as the end of next year.

Netflix's carbon footprint hit 1.1 million metric tons last year. That roughly equals the footprint of a town with 150,000 homes.

The company will first reduce its internal operational emissions, aligning with the Paris Agreement's goal (https://unfccc.int/process-and-meetings/the-paris-agreement/the-paris-agreement#::text=The%20Paris%20Agreement%20is%20a,compared%20to%20pre%2Dindustrial%20levels.) to limit global warming to 1.5degC. It will reduce Scope 1 emissions, the pollution directly from a corporation's operations, and Scope 2 emissions, or those linked to its energy use, by 45% by 2030, based on Science-Based Targets Initiative Guidance (https://sciencebasedtargets.org/resources/files/SBTi-criteria.pdf).

The remainder of the emissions -- Scope 3, or those created by vendors and customers throughout a supply chain -- will be offset by investing in carbon capture projects, including conserving tropical forests, restoring grasslands and mangroves, and promoting healthy soils, as well as capturing and storing carbon, the company said in a blog post (https://about.netflix.com/en/sustainability).

Netflix(NFLX) is the latest of an expanding group of technology and other companies that see marketing value in advancing climate-friendly policies, especially with increasingly popular "net zero" pledges. Environmental and alternative-energy groups are generally embracing corporate interest but are closely monitoring whether companies will cut their own pollution and fossil-fuel use in a timely fashion, or are relying too much on "offsetting" energy use without fundamental change to operations. Transparency is a key requirement, say these groups.

Read:Global investors with $54 trillion tell companies pledging net zero emissions to show their work (https://www.marketwatch.com/story/investors-with-54-trillion-tell-companies-pledging-net-zero-emissions-to-show-their-work-11616439049)

Pressure is also rising on voluntary carbon-offset markets to meet this rising corporate demand to hit "net zero" and deliver what they promise, write Oliver Miltenberger of the University of Melbourne and Matthew Potts, of the University of California, Berkeley, in a commentary (https://theconversation.com/why-corporate-climate-pledges-of-net-zero-emissions-should-trigger-a-healthy-dose-of-skepticism-156386).

"It's getting better, but over-reliance on this method for counterbalancing emissions does risk some entities' using offsets as a right to pollute," the researchers said.

About half of its emissions are generated by physical production of Netflix-branded films and series including those managed directly or through a third-party producer. That count also includes Netflix-branded licensed content. The rest is generated by corporate operations at offices or via its marketing efforts. Cloud providers like Amazon Web Services(AMZN) and the Open Connect content delivery network used to stream the service account for 5% of the footprint.

The latest pledge "does not include emissions from internet transmission or electronic devices our members use to watch Netflix," the company said. "Internet service providers and device manufacturers have operational control over the design and manufacturing of their equipment, so ideally account for those emissions themselves."

But Netflix said it has joined a research effort call DIMPACT, led by the University of Bristol, which is developing a calculator to measure the household footprint of streaming and other internet uses.

Netflix topped 200 million streaming subscribers for the first time at the end of 2020, as sign-ups surged despite higher prices in the U.S. and Canada, the company reported earlier this year in its most recent earnings report (https://www.marketwatch.com/story/netflix-tops-200-million-subscribers-with-year-end-flourish-stock-jumps-8-11611090797#::text=The%20No.,%245.47%20billion%20a%20year%20ago.).

Read:Here's what's worth streaming in April 2021: 'Handmaid's Tale,' 'Mosquito Coast' and much more (https://www.marketwatch.com/story/heres-whats-worth-streaming-in-april-2021-handmaids-tale-mosquito-coast-and-much-more-11617031295)

Emma Stewart, the company's first sustainability officer, also highlighted the rising viewership of climate-focused content on its streaming service.

"We acknowledge the reach of sustainability stories on Netflix," she said, noting that in 2020, 160 million households watched at least one sustainability related title. Some 100 million households tuned into Our Planet since the launch in 2019 of the series of nature and ecology documentaries hosted by David Attenborough.

Shares of Netflix are down 5.9% in the year to date, though up 35% over the past year. The S&P 500 is up 5.3% in the year to date and up 53% over the past year.

-Rachel Koning Beals; 415-439-6400; AskNewswires@dowjones.com

	

(END) Dow Jones Newswires

March 30, 2021 12:50 ET (16:50 GMT)

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